Salmon Burgers with Basil and Orange

It’s summer, and the real question most evenings is what easy, healthy meal I can throw together right after work that we can pack up for a short evening excursion to the pool.

These simple, Omega-3 rich salmon burgers certainly fit the bill. They take only 5 minutes to mix and another 10 at most to cook, and can be packed up on top of some fresh spinach and diced tomatoes and eaten with a fork, or thrown unceremoniously into a sliced wholegrain bun with a smear of mayo or tartar sauce.

I do pan-fry them, because they would be a little delicate to grill unless you used a (stainless steel) grill pan. Once they cook a little, they tend to hold together decently well.

As a bonus, Maya loves these, and it’s not easy to get a toddler to eat fish!

Ingredients:

1 can (wild-caught) salmon (the BPA-free brands are: Oregon’s Choice, Wild Planet, Vital Choice and Eco-fish)

2 (organic, pastured) eggs

1 Tbl (organic) dijon mustard

6 Tbls (organic) Panko bread crumbs (these do exist; I found them in the organic specialty section at Whole Foods)

1 (organic) orange, sliced in half and one-half juiced

2 Tbls chopped fresh (organic) basil

Salt and pepper to taste

Olive oil

Balsamic vinegar for finishing

Directions:

Empty the can of salmon into a bowl and pick out the small bones. Add mustard, basil, orange juice, bread crumbs, and salt and pepper. Let the mixture sit while you warm the pan with a generous amount of olive oil.

Form into patties and fry in the oil, turning infrequently. Makes about 8 patties.

Serve over bed of greens, such as fresh spinach, topped with a squeeze of the other side of the orange, and a dribble of balsamic vinegar, with a side of (organic) tartar sauce, or on a bun.

3 thoughts on “Salmon Burgers with Basil and Orange

  1. Hi, so I came across your site a few weeks ago and have been reading through your articles. I have lots of questions! On the cooking topic, can you tell us more about your blender/mixer. Can it puree veggies like carrots into juice and make almonds into almond butter? I love that it is stainless steel! Are there components that might touch the food like lids or under the blades that are plastic? Are they BPA free? I can’t really find info on it anywhere and amazon has just a couple reviews. I have wanted a vita-mix but the plastic and price has held me back, My old glass blender with a BPA containing lid and base started smoking yesterday so I need a replacement! Thanks!

    • Hi Anna! Thanks for your question. Unfortunately, the mixer I linked to is NOT the one I have, which was brought to us by my mother-in-law from India (it’s here: http://www.masticart.com/index.php/home-appliances/food-processors-and-juicers/kenstar-smart-110v-mixer-grinder.html, but I can’t find a listing for sale in the U.S.). On mine, the inside of two of the attachment bowls (a large and small) are almost all stainless steel, with the exception of the lids, which are plastic. The Preethi system I found available in the U.S. (http://www.perfectpeninsula.com/PreethiNitro.html) looks similar, except that their mid-size container is also stainless steel, but they do have plastic covers. I did not write to ask them what plastic they are using for the covers, and would love to know. In terms of the power, the Indian “mixees” as they are called are intended to pulverize nuts, rice, lentils and other hard items for use in chutneys, pickles, and dosa flour, and I used ours to make great baby food for Maya. They would definitely work with chopped carrots and that sort of vegetable to make a paste, and with water added, a juice. Sorry I don’t have all the answers on this one, but this should be a start! Please let me know if you find out more on the item! All best,
      Laura

    • Hi Anna! Thanks for your question. Unfortunately, the mixer I linked to is NOT the one I have, which was brought to us by my mother-in-law from India (it’s here: http://www.masticart.com/index.php/home-appliances/food-processors-and-juicers/kenstar-smart-110v-mixer-grinder.html, but I can’t find a listing for sale in the U.S.). On mine, the inside of two of the attachment bowls (a large and a small one) are almost all stainless steel, with the exception of the lids, which are plastic. The blades are stainless as well. The Preethi system I found available in the U.S. (http://www.perfectpeninsula.com/PreethiNitro.html) looks similar, except that their mid-size container is also stainless steel, but they do have plastic covers. I did not write to ask them what plastic they are using for the covers, and would love to know. In terms of the power, the Indian “mixees” as they are called are intended to pulverize nuts, rice, lentils and other hard items for use in chutneys, pickles, and dosa flour, and I used ours to make great baby food for Maya. They would definitely work with chopped carrots and that sort of vegetable to make a paste, and with water added, a juice. Sorry I don’t have all the answers on this one, but this should be a start! Please let me know if you find out more on the item! All best,
      Laura

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