DIY Furniture Re-Do: Breathing New Life into Furniture with Chalk Paint

IMG_2294One of my beefs with cheaper types of new furniture is that it’s more or less designed to end up pretty quickly in a landfill. Some of the press-board stuff that you have to assemble can’t even be moved once!

Other pieces, even from higher-end stores, have press-board backs as well as drawer bottoms and sides. Under current law, sadly, companies can call things “solid wood” even when they are made of medium density fibreboard (MDF), particle board or other types of composite materials, yet this stuff is basically chemicals and pressed sawdust, and off-gasses formaldehyde, glues and other nastiness.

Enter chalk paint. With a can of this low-VOC paint and a little wax, even the most dinged-up old wooden pieces can get a new lease on life. The paint is self-priming, so there’s no need to strip the finish from furniture beforehand. It could also be used to seal exposed parts of pieces that have dubious materials inside, to prevent more off-gassing.

Needless to say, this is a huge problem solver for me. Although I have a soft spot for some mid-century design, pieces that are in great condition are expensive. Furniture strippers and refinishing materials are aromatic solvents and are generally toxic, so I don’t really want to mess with them. And nothing’s more green, potentially funkier, or easier on the wallet than upcycling lovely old real wood furniture.

There are a couple of high-end brands of chalk paint, like Annie Sloan and CeCe Caldwell, and there are also recipes online to make your own with a variety of additions to any paint. If you decide to make your own and use the Plaster of Paris method, be sure to follow all safety precautions and do not inhale it. Also, it may help to ensure the base paint is a truly zero-VOC paint like Mythic. One furniture redo diva I spoke with uses baking soda in regular paint as in this how-to, and claims it works like a charm, though others think it’s best for distressed finishes.

I originally played around with some Annie Sloan paint and wax, because I found a local “stockist” for it. It isn’t cheap, though, and the colors are limited (though gorgeous). In addition, the wax comes with a troubling warning under Prop 65, California’s labeling law for hazardous substances, and has a bit of an odor at first. I turned on a fan, opened the window, and wouldn’t let the two-year-old near the final project until the wax was cured.

Since my experiments below, I’ve found a company selling their own DIY chalk paint powder that claims to have a greener wax, Fiddes & Sons. I’m not thrilled with their vagueness about their ingredients, but I’m inclined to give it a go. They also have some helpful supplies, like a wax brush attachment to use on a drill that finishes larger projects in no time. I haven’t yet tried their stuff, so I’ll keep you posted.

Since I discovered the magically transformative properties of chalk paint, I’ve purchased two painted pieces made by local furniture folks (one found on my favorite new mid-century furniture site, Krrrb, and another from Craigslist). The pictures are here to give you an idea of the “looks” that are possible with painted pieces.

Here’s a romantically shabby chic drop-leaf desk that fit perfectly in a small corner of the bedroom:

IMG_2296And a groovy re-do of a mid-century dresser in which the new white paint covers over numerous scratches flawlessly and makes the piece pop, from Salvage Modern, a mom-owned local business whose owners are just lovely:

IMG_2287 IMG_2289I also used chalk paint to add a more fun and decorative element to the elephant insets on my nightstand (matching it to the drop desk). The insets were dull, and no one could see the elephants on the piece as they were too dark. I decided it would be funky to add a bit of relaxed color. The new friend who sold me the desk was kind enough to donate a small amount of the chalk paint she used, and some wax, for the project.

First, I taped up the back area. Then I added two coats of paint and a very light coat of wax, just using a paper towel. Next, I buffed the wax for a good little while with an old cloth diaper, and last, I distressed it lightly with fine sandpaper.

Another easy project was to use chalk paint to jazz up a small, cheap thrift store purchase of a bookshelf for the playroom. For this, I involved my trusty assistant, and we yukked it up while making potato stamps in a star and heart shape, and dipping them into contrasting white paint after painting a few base coats in Annie Sloan‘s Florence paint.

The end result was cute and gives me a little storage for art supplies.

The upshot? Chalk paint provides a fun and easy way to upgrade your existing or used furniture, saving it from an untimely trip to the landfill and making it your own.

As I’ll explain in my next post, I also recently used chalk paint to add a pop of color to a basement bathroom by refinishing and updating a hideous faux-wood bathroom vanity and light fixtures, saving tons of money and giving the whole room a much fresher look. I can’t wait to show this to you, as I’m so happy with the “renovation.” More coming soon!

While you’re waiting, here are a few other posts you may like:

DIY Gift: Photo or Holiday Card Wine Corkboards

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It cost two dollars and 42 cents, which is cheaper than a cup of coffee these days. When I saw this shabby chic porcelain frame (with emphasis on the shabby) at our local Value Village last week, I just knew it was destined for grander things.

I pondered for a while, then happened across these fun, modern handmade corkboards, and knew what had to happen. I collected our few corks, and petitioned the list serv for more. They came through for me, as always, offering up 40 or so corks from several families. (One woman also mentioned this very cool art supply recycling place in Washington, DC, which is now on my list for a near-future visit.)

The advantage of corks for hanging a photo, besides their nifty visual appeal, is the ease of changing the images. You could use a large-format version of this project for holiday cards or children’s artwork, while smaller ones work well for family snaps that you want to switch with frequency. They also look great in multiples, as shown here.

This project is fast and easy once the supplies are rounded up, and is a great way to up-cycle well-used frames and get more life out of wine corks. Any size frame will work, though I’ll note that 5X7 was a good fit for the corks, including a sideways row. You’ll also need about twice as many corks as you think, given their variance in thickness and length. The trick is to play around until they fit neatly, and to make subtle trims with a very sharp paring knife in any corks that are too long or wide, in places where the cuts won’t show.

I removed the glass so that if I decided later on I would rather have a picture frame without the corks, I could pop them out with the paper and reinstall the glass.

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What you’ll need:

  • Picture frame (there are always tons at thrift stores!)
  • Background paper to fill the opening in the frame in a complimentary color (cardstock works well for this)
  • Wine corks sufficient to fill the opening in the frame, plus some
  • Hot glue gun (a small one works fine) and glue sticks
  • Thumbtacks for photos
  • Paring knife

Directions:

Tinker with the corks you have on hand, trimming as needed with a paring knife, until they fit neatly in the frame without popping up or putting too much pressure on each other. Remove them carefully to maintain your design.

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Cut the background paper cardstock to fit the opening and put it into the frame. Restore the corks. One at a time, glue to the paper with the most interesting part of each cork’s design facing outward, using a thick strip of glue, and press each for a moment.

Once finished, let it dry for a few minutes, then use the thumbtacks to add a photo or two. Hang and enjoy!

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Of course, picture frames make a lovely gift, particularly when filled with a nice photo. I love these unique frames from Scrappin’ Sassy on Etsy, which add a whimsical touch (and she takes custom orders if you have a paper design you love, as I did for Maya’s nursery). And here’s a nice idea for a framed, fabric earring holder from a fellow blogger that looks simple enough to make for a gift.

One more idea: you can also frame chalkboard paper for a simple home-made chalkboard. The contact paper sticks onto anything and can be easily trimmed to size, as I did below for our kitchen using a simple drugstore frame just after Maya was born.

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Chalkboard paper also looks great cut into shapes like circles for the wall of a playroom! And here’s some fun (and safer) veggie-based chalk for use indoors by the kiddos.