A Green Thanksgiving with Sorrel Soup

Green options at Thanksgiving are always a bit less exciting than the orange and brown delectables. I do love brussels sprouts, roasted, or braised in white wine and topped with gorgonzola, but they are not for everyone. And the green salad we always dutifully prep up is usually intact at the end of the meal, faring poorly against the competition.

So why not kick off the meal with a lovely green soup? While sorrel is typically thought of in the spring, when it’s tender and new, autumn sorrel retains a wonderful lemony flavor, and can still be found in the farmer’s markets, at least where we live in Maryland.

This easy soup is adapted from the mistress of gardens, Alice Waters, and her Chez Panisse cookbook. It can be prepared ahead, and finished at the last minute with a quick reheating and immersion (stick) blender. It has great flavor, and would make a remarkable — and elegant — way to open the feast. It goes without saying that this soup would also be wonderful chilled in the high heat of summer.

You will want some really lovely fresh cream, so if you can obtain the grassfed, organic kind from a farm share or market, that’s the way to go.

Ingredients:

1 Tbl (organic, grassfed) butter

1 medium (organic) boiling potato or several smaller ones, diced

1 cup (organic) chicken stock or vegetable stock (do not use plain water, as there will be insufficient flavor, and if using vegetable stock, you may want more cream and salt)

1 medium (organic) yellow onion, diced

1 1/2 large bunches (organic or near-organic) sorrel (about 1.5 lbs.) (I have added sorrel to punch up the flavor a bit)

1 (organic) carrot or 7 small ones, diced

1 1/2 cup (grassfed, organic) cream (I also added a lot more cream than Ms. Waters — up to a pint is just fine with me)

3 sprigs (organic) thyme, chopped

Salt and pepper to taste

2 1/3 cup water

2 Tbls crumbled (happy pig) bacon, for garnish (optional)

Directions:

Melt the butter in a saucepan and add the thyme, diced potato, onion, and carrot.

Pour in 1/3 cup of the water, cover, and stew gently for 15 minutes, with the lid ajar. Add the rest of the water (2 cups), salt and pepper, and stock, and bring to a simmer. Stew this for another 15 minutes, until the potatoes are soft and easily mashed.

Meanwhile, chop sorrel leaves into thin strips. When the potatoes are finished, add the sorrel, and return soup to a simmer, then turn off and let it stand for 5 minutes. (You can reserve some finely chopped sorrel for garnish. And if you are serving this later, you can let this sit in the fridge or on the back of the stove until ready to serve.)

Purée the soup in a blender (glass is best) or use an immersion blender in the pot, then stir in the cream. Taste (and add more cream). Garnish with bacon and/or chopped sorrel. Serve and enjoy!

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Easy Herb Popovers

This is one of my few go-to recipes. I make these deliciously unctuous popovers probably once a week (enough so that my husband’s really over them!). But I like it because Maya helps to mix the batter, and then we have 25 minutes to hang out, or for me to get dressed, before breakfast is ready.

If we only have 3 eggs in the house, it’s still a good breakfast for 3 adults plus a child, and they are terrific with smoked salmon, scrambled eggs, or goat cheese. I add whatever fresh herbs we have handy — chives, parsley, cilantro and tarragon all work well — a mix of these or others is also tasty.

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3/4 cup (organic) all-purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon celery salt

3 large (organic, pastured) eggs (2 will do in a pinch)

1 cup whole (organic, grassfed) milk (skim or 2 percent milk will not work)

1 Tbl (organic, grassfed) butter

2-3 Tbls mixed chopped fresh herbs

Butter a 12-cup muffin tin (avoid non-stick if you can). Sift flour and celery salt into bowl, add the eggs, milk, butter and beat until mixed well. Stir in herbs and pour into the muffin tin (I usually need a spoon to divide the batter evenly when done). Place in COLD oven, and set the temperature for 425F and bake for 26 minutes without opening the oven door.

Turn on the oven light and watch them puff up! They should be done after 26 minutes — and will continue to cook in the tin after you take them out. Do not overcook, as they will get chewy and tough.

Modified from “The Book of Breakfasts and Brunches,” by Kerenza Harries.